Monopolistic Market

A type of market that features one, if not all, of the traits of a monopoly such as high price levels, supply constraints, or excessive barriers to entry. Because this type of market would be comprised of one supplying firm, consumers would have no choice but to purchase solely from this firm. Without proper legislation or controls, this firm possesses the power to raise prices without adversely affecting demand for its products/services. This type of market stands in contrast to a perfectly competitive market.

A monopolistic market favors companies to the detriment of consumers. The market, in this case, is usually defined as a stock market sector such as telecommunications or media firms, where this type of market behavior is likely to be found.

There are several groups and trade organizations, such as the FCC, WTO and EU governing council, that ensure that monopolistic markets do not form and also create legal ramifications for companies that pursue market-cornering policies. The Microsoft antitrust trials of the late '90s show that the markets are still fighting against monopolistic behavior, even today.


Investment dictionary. . 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • monopolistic — mo‧nop‧o‧lis‧tic [məˌnɒpəˈlɪstɪk◂ ǁ məˌnɑː ] adjective ECONOMICS controlling or trying to control an industry or business activity completely by not allowing other companies to compete fairly: • monopolistic market conditions • Unfair… …   Financial and business terms

  • Market power — Competition law Basic concepts History of competition law Monopoly Coercive monopoly Natural monopoly …   Wikipedia

  • Monopolistic competition in international trade — Monopolistic competition models are used under the rubric of imperfect competition in International Economics. This model is a derivative of the monopolistic competition model that is part of basic economics. Here it is tailored to international… …   Wikipedia

  • monopolistic competition — Market situation in which many independent buyers and sellers may exist but competition is limited by specific market conditions. The theory was developed almost simultaneously by Edward Hastings Chamberlin in his Theory of Monopolistic… …   Universalium

  • Market failure — is a concept within economic theory wherein the allocation of goods and services by a free market is not efficient. That is, there exists another conceivable outcome where a market participant may be made better off without making someone else… …   Wikipedia

  • Market dominance — is a measure of the strength of a brand, product, service, or firm, relative to competitive offerings. There is often a geographic element to the competitive landscape. In defining market dominance, you must see to what extent a product, brand,… …   Wikipedia

  • Market Segmentation Index — or Celli Index of Market Segmentation, named after the Italian economist Celli G. GianLuca, is a measure of market segmentation. This Index, is a comparative measure of the degree of monopoly power in two distinctive markets for products that… …   Wikipedia

  • Monopolistic competition — Short run equilibrium of the firm under monopolistic competition. The firm maximizes its profits and produces a quantity where the firm s marginal revenue (MR) is equal to its marginal cost (MC). The firm is able to collect a price based on the… …   Wikipedia

  • Market structure — Economics …   Wikipedia

  • market — marketer, n. /mahr kit/, n. 1. an open place or a covered building where buyers and sellers convene for the sale of goods; a marketplace: a farmers market. 2. a store for the sale of food: a meat market. 3. a meeting of people for selling and… …   Universalium

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.